Heat Shield Details

STRUCTURAL HONEYCOMB CORE _

LAYER (0.25-INCH SQUARE HEAT REFLECTING" CRES CELLS, 0.0015 FOIL jApp LAYSS

THICKNESS) - E LAYERS

BRAZING FOIL LAYERS

■ HEAT SHIELD SUPPORT CHANNEL (CRES)

OUTER FACE SHEET (0.010 CRES)'

BRAZING FOIL LAYER (0.0015 AG-CU-LI)

M-31 INSULATION IMPREGNATED INTO HONEYCOMB CORE

INSULATION RETAINING HONEYCOMB CORE LAYER (0.50-INCH SQUARE CRES CELLS, 0.0015 FOIL THICKNESS)

STRUCTURAL HONEYCOMB CORE _

LAYER (0.25-INCH SQUARE HEAT REFLECTING" CRES CELLS, 0.0015 FOIL jApp LAYSS

THICKNESS) - E LAYERS

■ HEAT SHIELD SUPPORT CHANNEL (CRES)

BRAZING FOIL LAYERS

SPACER (0.50 DIA, 0.06 WALL CRES TUBE)

-RADIAL BEAM ASSEMBLY

CROSS BEAM

RADIAL BEAM REINFORCING ANGLE

-RADIAL BEAM ASSEMBLY

CROSS BEAM

Cross Stiffening Brackets

CROSS BEAM WEB STIFFENING BRACKETS

RADIAL BEAM

REINFORCING

BRACKET

Figure 4-7

CROSS BEAM WEB STIFFENING BRACKETS

RADIAL BEAM

REINFORCING

BRACKET

■REINFORCED MOUNTING STUD FLANGE

LOX TANK MOUNTING STUD CH 14339

Figure 4-7

PROPULSION.

The S-IB stage propulsion system consists of an eight-engine cluster of H-l engines that burn lox and RP-1 fuel to propel the Saturn IB vehicle during the first boost phase of powered flight. Propellant from the lox and fuel tanks feed the H-l engines under tank pressure to assure the NPSH necessary for satisfactory engine operation. Boosters S-IB-1 through S-IB-5 used engines developing 200,000 lbf of thrust for a total stage thrust of 1,600,000 Ibf. Boosters S-IB-6 and subsequent will use engines developing 205,000 lbf of thrust for a total stage thrust of 1,640,000 lbf. Four inboard engines are mounted 90 deg apart (at vehicle positions I, II, III, and IV) on a 32-in radius from the vehicle longitudinal axis and are canted 3 deg outboard from the vehicle centerline. Four outboard engines are gimbal mounted 90 deg apart (at fin lines 2, 4, 6, and 8) on a 95-in. radius from'the vehicle longitudinal axis. The engines cant outboard 6 deg fr6m the vehicle centerline. Each of the eight engines is attached by'a gimbal assembly to its thrust pad on the tail unit thrust structure. Inboard engine thrust pads are on the barrel assembly and outboard engine thrust pads are on the thrust support outriggers. Although the inboard engines do not gimbal for vehicle control the gimbal assemblies permit alignment of the engines to the thrust-structure; two turnbuckles used on each inboard engine, with the gimbal assembly, align and secure the engine in place. Two hydraulic actuators and a gimbal assembly secure each out board engine to the thrust structure. The actuators attach to an actuator support beam, which is part of the thrust support outrigger. The actuators, one mounted in the pitch plane and one in the yaw plane, gimbal the engine for vehicle attitude control. The engine gimbal centerline for both outboard and inboard engines lies in a plane perpendicular to the vehicle longitudinal axis at vehicle station 100 (figure 4-8). Canting the engines provides stability by directing the thrust vectors to common points on the vehicle longitudinal axis. The outboard engine thrust vectors intersect the longitudinal axis at vehicle station 1004, while the inboard engine thrust vectors intersect the longitudinal axis at vehicle station 711. The difference in cant angles and radii from vehicle centerline account for the two different intersect points. Directing the thrust vectors to the vehicle longitudinal axis reduces the possibility of excessive loading of the vehicle structure in the event of engine(s) failure during flight.

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