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MSFC MTP-M-TEST-61-10 MSFC MTP-M-S& M-P-61-1 MSFC MTP-LOD-DIR-60-49.1 MSFC MTP-LOD-ED-60-49.2b Conaway, J. D. , MERCURY-REDSTONE System Reliability Test Report. Rate Switches. 13 April 1961 (IUO) (QUAL). Coleman, R.H., Reliability Test Report Altitude Error Sensor MERCURY-REDSTONE System. 30 November 1960 (IUO). Coleman, R.H., MERCURY-REDSTONE System Reliability Test Report for Control Voltage Failure Detector. 30 November 1960 (IUO) (QUAL). Dalton, Charles, Mission Reliability of Booster...

Blockhouse Electrical Ground Support Equipment

The following specialized equipment, required for the launching of MERCURY-REDSTONE vehicles, was installed in the blockhouse on Vertical Launch Facility (VLF) 56. The inverter panel, shown in Figure 7-12, was a standard inverter panel used for previous vehicles. It presented frequency deviations and voltage indications and contained controls for the ground and vehicle 115-volt, 400-cycle inverters. 7.5.3.3 Environmental Control Panel The environmental control panel, shown in Figure 7-13, was...

GENERAL

The MERCURY-REDSTONE Launch Vehicle control system maintained the proper attitude of the vehicle throughout the flight. This was accomplished by establishing and maintaining three reference axes and indicating, through error voltages, any deviation from the programmed flight. The two major gyros were the pitch gyro and the yaw-roll gyro. An integrating accelerometer (gyro type) gave a cutoff signal to the propulsion system when the predetermined velocity had been attained. Carbon jet vanes...

Launch Azimuth Considerations

The original MERCURY-REDSTONE launch azimuth of 105 degrees was selected on the basis of minimum overland time, adequate distance from downrange islands (including all dispersions), optimum tracking coverage, nonhazardous Cape impact locations, and suitable recovery areas. This selection was also based on analysis of prevailing winds in the launch area and the development of a system of interchangeable escape rockets with different directions of lateral displacement. While the RSD concurred in...

Launch Countdown

To prevent personnel fatigue, the 10-hour MERCURY-REDSTONE countdown was performed in two parts. The first of these parts was performed on the day preceding launch day and covered the operations normally performed from T-640 to T-390 minutes of the countdown. The second part began at approximately 2300 hours on the day preceding launch (including built-in holds) and covered the operations normally performed from T-390 minutes of the countdown until vehicle liftoff. This system of operation...

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Electrical Systems Analysis MR-3. 7 December 1960 (IUO) (QUAL). Bruce, R.B., Test Conductor's Report MR-3, 6 December 1960 (IUO) (QUAL). Smith, A.G., Radio Frequency Systems Test Report MR-3. 1 December 1960 (IUO) (QUAL). Guidance and Control System Checkout MR-3. 2 December 1960 (IUO) (QUAL). Measuring System Analysis MR-3. 2 December 1960 (IUO) (QUAL). Kulas, F., Final Mechanical Pressure and Functional Analysis of Missile MR-3, 5 December 1960 (IUO) (QUAL). Gwinn, Ralph T., Provisional...

Range Safety

7.4.1 RANGE SAFETY OFFICER (RSO) OPERATIONS For ballistic vehicles, such as MERCURY-REDSTONE, the RSO had a plotting board display indicating the real time impact point, which was the point where the vehicle would impact if thrust termination occurred at the time of presentation. The data sources available to the IBM 7090 computer, or Impact Predictor, were the C-band radars at the Cape, Patrick AFB, GBI, and the AZUSA Mark II at the Cape. The beatbeat system, developed by LOD, measured the...

Emergency Equipment

The mobile aerial tower, shown in Figure 7-5, was originally intended, by STG, to be used with the MERCURY-AT LAS. Because of desire to gain experience, and since time studies revealed it to be faster than the remote controlled structure under certain conditions, it was selected for egress of the self-sustaining astronaut after the service structure was removed from around the vehicle. The tower, cherry picker, was capable of reaching vertical heights of 125 feet. The tower cab was specially...

Recovery System Design

The recovery system consisted of a g sensitive switch, a sequencing system, a system to initiate a deployment system, a two-stage parachute system, parachute containers, a structure to distribute the parachute forces into the booster, heat protection, and an instrumentation system to furnish information about recovery system operation to the booster telemetry system. The recovery system was packaged in a self-contained unit. Figures 6-9 through 6-12 illustrate the operation of the recovery...

Qac

Propulsion and Auxiliary Propulsion Panels, Blockhouse 56 instrument compartment test portions of the panel. This switch was de-energized when the function selector switch was positioned in the launch position. The components test switches provided manual control for individually operating all the main valves in the propulsion system. The instrument compartment pressure test switch was provided to manually pressure test the compartment. The 115-volt, 60-cycle LOX valve and the...

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Humphrey, John, and Bertram, Emil, Preliminary MERCURY-REDSTONE Booster Recovery Operations at Atlantic Missile Range, 20 May 1960. Kuettner, J. P., Bertram, E.P., MERCURY Project Summary, MERCURY-REDSTONE Launch Development and Performance 1963 USA . Kuettner, J. P., Bertram, E.P., The Manned Rocket Vehicle MERCURY-REDSTONE, Proceedings of the Twelfth International Astronautical Congress, 1962 USA . Brandner, F.W., Proposal for MERCURY-REDSTONE Automatic Inflight Abort Sensing System, 5 June...