Mission Trajectory And Maneuver Description

Facts About Apollo

(Note Information presented herein is based upon a nominal mission and is subject to change prior mission or In real time during the mission to meet changing conditions.) Apollo 9 Is scheduled to be launched at 11 a.m. EST from NASA Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A on a 72-degree azimuth and inserted Into a 103 nm (119 sm, 191.3 km) circular Earth orbit by Saturn V launch vehicle No. 504. Insertion will take place at 10 minutes 59 seconds after liftoff. Following insertion into orbit,...

Launch Facilities

Kennedy Space Center performs preflight checkout, test and launch of the Apollo 9 space vehicle. A government-industry team of about 550 will conduct the final countdown from Firing Room 2 of the Launch Control Center (LCC). The firing room team Is backed up by more than 5,000 persons who are directly involved in launch operations at KSC from the time the vehicle and spacecraft stages arrive at the center until the launch is completed. Initial checkout of the Apollo spacecraft is...

Flight Plan Summary

Following Is a brief summary of tasks to be accomplished in Apollo 9 on a day-to-day schedule. Apollo 9 work days are not on a 24-hour basis but rather on a variable mission phase and crew activity basis. Rest periods are scheduled at Irregular intervals between mission phases Launch Day (0-19 hours elapsed time) * CSM systems checkout following insertion into 103 nm orbit * Preparations for transposition, docking and LM ejection * CSM separation, transposition and docking with lunar module *...

Survival Lights

Rucksack No. 2 one three-man life raft with C02 Inflater, one sea anchor, two sea dye markers, three sunbonnets one mooring lanyard, three manlines and two attach brackets. The survival kit is designed to provide a 48-hour postlanding (water or land) survival capability for three crewmen between 40 degrees North and South latitudes. The Apollo 9 crew biomedical telemetry data received by the Manned Space Plight Network will be relayed for Instantaneous display at Mission Control Center where...

Get Tines Are Approximate

This burn at 95 41 48 GET of 39.9 fps (9.2 m sec) is at a 10-percent throttle setting and places the IM in a 142 x 144 nm (163 x 166 sm, 263 x 265 km) near circular orbit and 11 miles above that of the CSM. For critical rendezvous maneuvers after the insertion burn, the CM pilot will be prepared to make a mirror-image burn of equal velocity but opposite in direction one minute after the scheduled LM maneuver time if for some reason the LM cannot make the maneuver. Such a CSM burn will cause the...

Recovery Operations

The primary landing point for Apollo 9 is in the West Atlantic at 59.9 degrees West Longitude by 30.1 degrees North Latitude for a nominal full-duration mission. Prime recovery vessel Is the helicopter landing platform USS Guadalcanal. Splashdown for a nominal mission launched on time at 11 a.m. EST, Feb. 28 will be at 9 46 a.m. EST, Mar. 10. Other ships along the launch-phase ground track, in addition to the Guadalcanal, will be the Apollo instrumentation ship Vanguard and the destroyer USS...

Usns Redstone Usns Mercury Usns Vanguard

After the S-IVB and CSM LM separate, dual-capability stations will be required to track both vehicles simultaneously to provide HP A G voice remoting from the CSM LM and VHF TLM data from the S-IVB lU. After LM power up, dual capability stations will be required to track the CSM via acquisition bus to provide VHP voice, and to track the LM on VHF to provide VHP TLM or voice. Stations having only one VHF system will track the CSM or LM in accordance with Houston requirements. SHIPS AND AIRCRAFT...

Launch Vehicle

The Saturn V, 363 feet tall with the Apollo spacecraft in place, generates enough thrust to place a 125-ton payload into a 105 nm circular Earth orbit or boost a smaller payload to the vicinity of any planet in the solar system. It can boost about 50 tons to lunar orbit. The thrust of the three propulsive stages range from more than 7.7 million pounds for the booster to 230,000 pounds for the third stage at operating altitude. Including the instrument unit, the launch vehicle is 281 feet tall....

Earth Escape Trajectory

Service Propulsion System SPS Burn No 1 A 36.8 fps 11.2 m sec docked SPS burn at 6 01 40 GET enhances spacecraft orbital lifetime and demonstrates stability of the CSM digital autopilot. The new orbit is 113 x 131 nm 130 x 151 sm, 290 x 243 km . This burn at 22 12 00 GET reduces CSM weight by 7 355 pounds 3 339 kg so that reaction control propellant usage in a contingency JM rescue CSM-active rendezvous would be lessened provides continuous SM RCS deorbit capability tests CSM digital autopilot...

Apollo Onboard Television

A lunar television camera of the type that will transmit a video signal back to Earth during Apollo lunar landing missions will be stowed aboard LM-3. Two television transmissions are planned for Apollo 9 one during the first manning and systems checkout of the LM, and the other during Schweickart's EVA. The first TV pass will be a test with the camera simply warmed up and passively transmitting during the systems checkout, and will last some seven minutes 46 27 - 46 34 GET during a pass over...

Golden Slippers

Aero Slippers

Among LM tests will be an out-of-plane docked burn of the descent stage engine under control of the LM digital autopilot, with the last portion of the burn manually throttled by the spacecraft commander. After LM power-down and crew transfer back to the command module, the fifth docked service propulsion engine burn will circularize the orbit at 133 nautical miles as a base orbit for the LM active rendezvous two days later. The fourth mission work day consists of further lunar module checks and...

Atlantic Splashdown

Stage measurements evolved from research and development to operational status, and instrumentation measurements were reduced from 342 to 280. In the instrument unit, the rate gyro timer, thermal probe, a measuring distributor, tape recorder, two radio frequency assemblies, a source follower, a battery and six measuring racks have been deleted. Instrumentation measurements were reduced from 339 to 221. During the Apollo 9 mission, communications between the spacecraft and the Mission Control...